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St. Joseph Bay, Florida 2011: Part 2, Frank Pate City Park Dusk Collection

If you haven’t read the first installment of the 2011 St. Joseph Bay trip, you can find it here.

Our journey to St. Joe began the late afternoon of Monday August the 8th. To be fair, “Big Crab’s” journey started out early that morning as he began the 8-hour drive to Panama City, Florida (where I call home). After his arrival, we prepared for our trip by going over gear lists, packing microscopes, and charging batteries. By the time we were finished preparing, evening turned into night and it was too late to try and make it down to …

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St. Joseph Bay, Florida 2011: Part 1, Introduction to the Bay

The St. Joe Trip has been the highlight of summer for ‘Big Crab’ and me. At one level, the trip is two like-minded friends getting away to informally investigate the marine environment. One of us is a professor and the other a soon to be professor (he hopes), and our work is an important part of our lives; it’s what we do for both work and fun.  The trip is not work, but it is about work. At quite another level, it’s a rare opportunity to learn from each other and the bay, as St. Joseph Bay has secrets that …

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Pilumnus sayi Rathbun, 1897: Spined-back hairy crab

Pilumnus sayi

Pilumnus sayi Rathbun, 1897

The spined-back hairy crab, Pilumnus sayi Rathbun, 1897, is a member of the diverse and specious genus Pilumnus Leach, 1815, a genus comprised of more than 140 nominal species found throughout the temprate and tropical waters of the world.

Range: Pilumnus sayi is common in a variety of marine habitats from seagrass meadows to offshore reefs. It is particularly common in fouling and encrusting communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where it is regularly encountered amongst sponges, tunicates and algaes on rocks, buoys, pilings, etc. Pilumnus sayi can be found from North Carolina through the …

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Welcome to the Crabby Taxonomists

Welcome! We are a group of naturalists working to understand the evolution of biological diversity on Earth.  Although our focus is largely on the systematics (classification) and taxonomy (naming) of marine crustaceans, we are, at our core, naturalists interested in exploring and understanding the natural world. This site is our place to share what we learn in our studies with you in an informal setting.

From time to time (ideally every week or two) we will post accounts of interesting species (like Dyspanopeus sayi, shown here) that we come across in our studies. Although these species accounts will be …

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